IN THE MEDIA


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TOP 10 NEW STORES FOR HOLIDAY SHOPPING IN TORONTO

New stores for holiday shopping in Toronto emphasize local support, artisanal design and serious style. Around the city, shops have popped up where you can find everything from the dreamiest succulents and planters to jewelery, designer apparel, and gifts both big and small.


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"Toronto entrepreneur gives vendors their own brick-and-mortar retail nooks"

Colleen Imrie's The Nooks – three storefront marketplaces on Danforth Ave. – give creatives a chance to sell handmade goods without the cost of setting up a shop.


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NOOKFEST

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For someone who isn’t an entertainer, Colleen Imrie certainly knows how to put on a show. Imrie, the owner of The Nooks General Store at 2005 Danforth Ave at Woodbine, has two shops that are close to each other on either side of the street. 


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nookFEST brings together artisans and entrepreneurs

Entrepreneur Sean Kung’s concrete homeware business, 1842, acts as a physical outlet for his creativity.

Compared to his “boring adult job” in digital media, creating concrete planters and lights is “a way to get that hands-on tangible work in,” he said.

Kung was one of more than 40 vendors at this year’s nookFEST. The event took place Sept. 9 on Woodmount Avenue and in the laneway behind The Nooks’ design store.


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Humans of Danforth East: Colleen from The Nooks

Her art and business background came together when Colleen owned her first business – a furniture consignment shop at Kingston Rd. and Warden. NiceNook Marketplace.

When she found that artists kept coming in, asking to have their art featured on her walls, Colleen saw a possible need for artisans to have a venue to showcase their work. She knew that a consignment model didn’t work for artists (as it left them with very little profit).  She wanted to come up with a different solution.  Instead of consignment, she offered to display their artwork for a flat monthly fee.  In return, they could make full profit from a sale.  It left artists with more money in their pockets and put them in control of their sales.  The idea began to build.